International Journal of Ayurveda Research International Journal of Ayurveda Research
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   2010| January-March  | Volume 1 | Issue 1  
    Online since February 12, 2010

 
 
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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Pharmaceutical preparation of Saubhagya Shunthi Churna: A herbal remedy for puerperal women
Khushbu Shukla, Manjari Dwivedi, Neeraj Kumar
January-March 2010, 1(1):25-29
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59940  PMID:20532094
Background: In the last few decades, there has been exponential growth in the field of herbal remedies. Pharmacopoeial preparations like avleha or paka (semi-solid), swarasa (expressed juice), kalka (mass), him (cold infusion) and phanta (hot infusion), kwatha (decoction) and churna (powder) form the backbone of Ayurvedic formulations. Newer guidelines for standardization, manufacture, and quality control, and scientifically rigorous research will be necessary for traditional treatments. This traditional knowledge can serve as powerful search engine that will greatly facilitate drug discovery. Purpose: The aim of the present study is to standardize Saubhagya Shunthi Paka in churna (powder) form. The powder form makes this traditional drug more stable for long-term storage and hence, easier to preserve. Materials and Methods: Saubhagya Shunthi Paka is an ayurvedic formulation containing Shunthi (Zingiber officinalis) as one of its chief ingredients. The basic preparation of this drug is a semisolid. We checked the microbial load and nutrient values (using International Standard IS and Association of Official Analytical chemists AOAC methods) Results: The powdered form of Saubhagya Shunthi Churna yielded a weight loss of approximately 17.64% of the total weight of ingredients. The total energy of Churna (calculated based on nutrient content) was found higher over Paka. Conclusion: Saubhagya Shunthi Churna may be a good therapeutic and dietary medicine for Indian women, which may be easily prepared at home.
  2 3,614 1,029
GUEST EDITORIAL
Ayurveda: The time to experiment
MS Valiathan, Urmila Thatte
January-March 2010, 1(1):3-3
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59935  PMID:20532089
  1 2,513 1,063
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Response to Ayurvedic therapy in the treatment of migraine without aura
Prakash Balendu Vaidya, Babu S. R Vaidya, Sureshkumar K Vaidya
January-March 2010, 1(1):30-36
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59941  PMID:20532095
Migraine patients who do not respond to conventional therapy, develop unacceptable side-effects, or are reluctant to take medicines resort to complementary and alternative medicines (CAM). Globally, patients have been seeking various non-conventional modes of therapy for the management of their headaches. An Ayurvedic Treatment Protocol (AyTP) comprising five Ayurvedic medicines, namely Narikel Lavan, Sootshekhar Rasa, Sitopaladi Churna, Rason Vati and Godanti Mishran along with regulated diet and lifestyle modifications such as minimum 8 h sleep, 30-60 min morning or evening walk and abstention from smoking/drinking, was tried for migraine treatment. The duration of the therapy was 90 days. Out of 406 migraine patients who were offered this AyTP, 204 patients completed 90 days of treatment. Complete disappearance of headache and associated symptoms at completion of AyTP was observed in 72 (35.2%); mild episode of headache without need of any conventional medicines in 72 (35.2%); low intensity of pain along with conventional medicines in 50 (24.5%); no improvement in seven (3.4%) and worst pain was noted in three (1.4%) patients, respectively. In 144 (70.5%) of patients marked reduction of migraine frequency and pain intensity observed may be because of the AyTP. Though the uncontrolled open-label design of this study does not allow us to draw a definite conclusion, from this observational study we can make a preliminary assessment regarding the effectiveness of this ayurvedic treatment protocol.
  1 4,242 1,104
REVIEW ARTICLES
Shilajit: A panacea for high-altitude problems
Harsahay Meena, HK Pandey, MC Arya, Zakwan Ahmed
January-March 2010, 1(1):37-40
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59942  PMID:20532096
High altitude problems like hypoxia, acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, pulmonary edema, insomnia, tiredness, lethargy, lack of appetite, body pain, dementia, and depression may occur when a person or a soldier residing in a lower altitude ascends to high-altitude areas. These problems arise due to low atmospheric pressure, severe cold, high intensity of solar radiation, high wind velocity, and very high fluctuation of day and night temperatures in these regions. These problems may escalate rapidly and may sometimes become life-threatening. Shilajit is a herbomineral drug which is pale-brown to blackish-brown, is composed of a gummy exudate that oozes from the rocks of the Himalayas in the summer months. It contains humus, organic plant materials, and fulvic acid as the main carrier molecules. It actively takes part in the transportation of nutrients into deep tissues and helps to overcome tiredness, lethargy, and chronic fatigue. Shilajit improves the ability to handle high altitudinal stresses and stimulates the immune system. Thus, Shilajit can be given as a supplement to people ascending to high-altitude areas so that it can act as a "health rejuvenator" and help to overcome high-altitude-related problems.
  1 3,455 1,074
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
The Ayurvedic drug, Ksheerabala, ameliorates quinolinic acid-induced oxidative stress in rat brain
SS Swathy, M Indira
January-March 2010, 1(1):4-9
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59936  PMID:20532090
One of the mechanisms of neurotoxicity is the induction of oxidative stress. There is hardly any cure for neurotoxicity in modern medicine, whereas many drugs in Ayurveda possess neuroprotective effects; however, there is no scientific validation for these drugs. Ksheerabala is an ayurvedic drug which is used to treat central nervous system disorders, arthritis, and insomnia. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of Ksheerabala on quinolinic acid-induced toxicity in rat brain. The optimal dose of Ksheerabala was found from a dose escalation study, wherein it was found that Ksheerabala showed maximum protection against quinolinic acid-induced neurotoxicity at a dose of 15 µL/100 g body weight/day, which was selected for further experiments. Four groups of female albino rats were maintained for 21 days as follows: 1. Control group, 2. Quinolinic acid (55 µg/100 g body weight), 3. Ksheerabala (15 µL/100 g body weight), 4. Ksheerabala (15 µL/100 g body weight) + Quinolinic acid (55 µg/100 g body weight). At the end of the experimental period, levels of lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonyls, and activities of scavenging enzymes were analyzed. The results revealed that quinolinic acid intake caused enhanced lipid and protein peroxidation as evidenced by increased levels of peroxidation products such as malondialdehyde, hydroperoxide, conjugated dienes, and protein carbonyls. On the other hand, the activities of scavenging enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase as well as the concentration of glutathione were reduced. On coadminstration of Ksheerabala along with quinolinic acid, the levels of all the biochemical parameters were restored to near-normal levels, indicating the protective effect of the drug. These results were reinforced by histopathological studies.
  1 8,965 812
REVIEW ARTICLES
Building bridges between Ayurveda and Modern Science
Sanjeev Rastogi
January-March 2010, 1(1):41-46
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59943  PMID:20532097
The recent decade has witnessed many landmark observations, which have added to the scientific credentials of Ayurveda.It is however believed that instead of a retrospective approach of looking into the Ayurveda through the scientific reappraisals, a prospective approach through primary understanding of Ayurveda followed by a search into scientific linkage would be more appealing. This article brings the simplified yet scientific decoding of the core concepts of Ayurveda that form the framework of this ancient science of health.
  1 5,248 1,826
CASE REPORT
Subacute thyroiditis following ginger (Zingiber officinale) consumption
Suzan Sanavi, Reza Afshar
January-March 2010, 1(1):47-48
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59944  PMID:20532098
A woman with subacute thyroiditis following ginger consumption is presented. The diagnosis was confirmed by physical examination and laboratory tests, in two distinct episodes. The patient was cured and recommended to refuse ginger consumption.
  1 7,427 855
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Quality assessment of different marketed brands of Dasamoolaristam, an Ayurvedic formulation
V Kalaiselvan, Ankur Kalpeshkumar Shah, Falgun Babulal Patel, Chainesh Narendrabhai Shah, M Kalaivani, A Rajasekaran
January-March 2010, 1(1):10-13
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59937  PMID:20532091
Arista is a classical Ayurvedic preparation that is typically used as a digestive and cardiotonic. The present Investigation evaluated five different brands of Dasamoolaristam available in the market as per WHO and Indian Pharmacopoeial specifications. Various physicochemical parameters such as alcohol-soluble extractive, water-soluble extractive, total ash, acid-insoluble ash, total solid, and alcohol content were determined. The present investigation reveals that all the preparations contain acceptable levels of alcohol (less than 12% v/v). However, the preparations were found to contain unacceptable limits of microbial load although all showed the absence of Escherichia coli, Salmonella species, and Staphylococcus aureus.
  1 3,588 1,153
Pharmacognostic standardization of leaves of Calotropis procera (Ait.) R. Br. (Asclepiadaceae)
Y Murti, B Yogi, D Pathak
January-March 2010, 1(1):14-17
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59938  PMID:20532092
Calotropis procera, belonging to the Asclepidaceae family, is present more or less throughout India and in other warm, dry places such as, Warizistan, Afghanistan, Egypt, and tropical Africa. Its common names are Akra, Akanal, and Madar. The leaves of Calotropis procera are said to be valuable as an antidote for snake bite, sinus fistula, rheumatism, mumps, burn injuries, and body pain. The leaves of Calotropis procera are also used to treat jaundice. A study on Calotropis procera leaf samples extracted the air-dried leaf powder with different solvents such as petroleum-ether (60-80ºC), benzene, chloroform, ethanol, and sterile water. Preliminary phytochemical analysis was done long with measurement of the leaf constants, fluorescence characteristics, and extractive values. Quantitative estimation of total ash value, acid insoluble ash, and water- soluble ash may serve as useful indices for identification of the powdered drug. Histochemical studies which reveal rows of cylindrical palisade cells and, vascular bundles may also serve as useful indices for identification of the tissues. These studies suggested that the observed pharmacognostic and physiochemical parameters are of great value in quality control and formulation development of Calotropis procera.
  1 3,930 1,354
Effect of Diashis, a polyherbal formulation, in streptozotocin-induced diabetic male albino rats
Tushar K Bera, Debasis De, Kausik Chatterjee, Kazi M Ali, Debidas Ghosh
January-March 2010, 1(1):18-24
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59939  PMID:20532093
This study focuses on the effect of 'Diashis', a polyherbal formulation composed of eight medicinal plants for the management of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in rats. As oxidative stress is one of the consequences of diabetes, the activities of hepatic antioxidant enzymes and metabolic enzymes were evaluated. Treatment with 'Diashis' in STZ-induced diabetic rats resulted in a significant (P < 0.01) recovery in the activities of hepatic hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphatase along with correction in the levels of fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and liver and skeletal muscle glycogen. The oxidative stress status in the liver was corrected by 'Diashis,' which was highlighted by the recovery in the activities of catalase, peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase along with the correction in the quantity of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and conjugated diene. 'Diashis' was not found to have any metabolic toxicity. The antidiabetic effects of 'Diashis' were compared with those of the antidiabetic drug, 'Glibenclamide'.
  1 3,249 897
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Sample size calculation
Prashant Kadam, Supriya Bhalerao
January-March 2010, 1(1):55-57
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59946  PMID:20532100
  1 3,967 1,588
EDITORIAL
Editorial
Urmila Thatte
January-March 2010, 1(1):1-1
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59934  PMID:20532088
  - 1,708 583
EDUCATION FORUM
Global challenges of graduate level Ayurvedic education: A survey
Kishor Patwardhan, Sangeeta Gehlot, Girish Singh, H.C.S Rathore
January-March 2010, 1(1):49-54
DOI:10.4103/0974-7788.59945  PMID:20532099
In the present day scenario, Ayurveda is globally being perceived in several contradictory ways. Poor quality of Ayurveda graduates produced as a result of poorly structured and poorly regulated education system is at least one of the important factors responsible for this scenario. The present study was carried out to evaluate the 'Global challenges of graduate level Ayurvedic education' and is based on the responses of Ayurvedic students and Ayurvedic teachers from various educational institutions of India to a methodically validated questionnaire. As the study indicates, the poor standard of Ayurvedic education in India is definitely a cause of concern. The curriculum of Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery (BAMS) course of studies is required to be reviewed and restructured. The syllabi are required to be updated with certain relevant topics like laws governing the intellectual property rights, basic procedures of standardization of medicinal products, fundamental methods of evaluating the toxicity of the medicinal products, essentials of healthcare management and the basics of cultivation and marketing of medicinal plants. Furthermore, the study suggests that the Ayurvedic academicians are required to be trained in standard methods of research and documentation skills, and the educational institutions are required to be encouraged to contribute their share in building up the evidence base for Ayurveda in the form of quality education and research.
  - 5,432 1,122
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